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Flour Power | 2008

by Regan Gentry

The first new public sculpture commissioned by the Christchurch City Council’s Public Art Advisory Group. Funding for the work was made available from the Council’s Public Art Fund with a substantial donation from Dame Adrienne Stewart and the Estate of the late Sir Robertson Stewart.

Flour Power is the Trust's seventh permanent artwork in Christchurch. Gentry describes his work fondly as a ‘centrepiece’ for Stewart Plaza, “….as if a friendly giant has walked through the garden city gathering lamp-posts like flowers and tying them into a bunch with a car tyre.”

Flour Power is an impressive artistic statement, distinctive for both its formal qualities and commentary on the changing nature of New Zealand cities. As Gentry describes, “In Canterbury, fields of crops have given way to fields of houses. Rows of wheat have been replaced by rows of street lights. Farm tractors have grown smaller and multiplied exponentially, growing sleeker and faster, modified to ‘pull chicks’ instead of ploughs.”

Image credits:

Flour Power,  Regan Gentry, 2008

© Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o WaiwhetuSCAPE Public Art & Regan Gentry 

 

Regan Gentry 

b.1976. BFA 2000 Otago.

Artist Statement

As a sculptor my artistic practice typically depicts the relationship of people to their environment and how this is acted out.
Using a wide range of materials and situations my work is characterised by a playful musing and using of material, language, location and structure.
The phrases, materials and circumstances I employ in my works are chosen for their familiarity and well-established usage in our lives.
The interplay of people and place, local history and situational relevance often inform my conceptual decisions.


Flour Power was generously supported by:
Christchurch City Council's Public Art Fund
Dame Adrienne Stewart and the Estate of the late Sir Robertson Stewart

With special thanks to:
Anderson Lloyd Lawyers, Beca, Boffa Miskell, Chambers PR, Fletcher Construction, Heritage Management Services and Phil Price